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Question: What is predicate?

What is an example of a predicate?

A predicate is the part of a sentence, or a clause, that tells what the subject is doing or what the subject is. Let’s take the same sentence from before: “The cat is sleeping in the sun.” The clause sleeping in the sun is the predicate; it’s dictating what the cat is doing.

What is a predicate in a sentence?

A subject is the noun or pronoun-based part of a sentence, and a predicate is the verb-based part that the subject performs.

What is mean by predicate with example?

The predicate is the part of a sentence that includes the verb and verb phrase. The predicate of “The boys went to the zoo” is “went to the zoo.” We change the pronunciation of this noun (“PRED-uh-kit”) when we turn it into a verb (“PRED-uh-kate”).

What does predicate mean in grammar?

The predicate of a sentence is a portion of it which makes a claim about the subject. For instance, in “Mary smokes”, the predicate would be the verb “smokes”. In traditional grammar, sentences are regarded as consisting of a subject plus a predicate.

What is simple predicate examples?

It includes a verb and all other details that describe what is going on. example: My father fixed the dryer. The simple predicate is the main verb in the predicate that tells what the subject does. example: My father fixed the dryer.

What’s the difference between a verb and a predicate?

A verb is a word class. And subject and predicate are the two main parts of a sentence. The predicate consists of a verb and its object(s) or when the verb is a linking verb as to be of verb and complement. A sentence makes a statement, a complete statement, and consists of the two parts, subject and predicate.

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What is another word for predicate?

In this page you can discover 36 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for predicate, like: proclaim, imply, profess, underpin, verb, part-of-speech, assert, mean, declare, state and signify.

What is subject and predicate examples?

Subject and Predicate



The complete subject tells whom or what the sentence is about. For example; The house, The red car, or The great teacher. The complete predicate tells what the subject is or does. For example; (The house) is white, (The red car) is fast, or (The great teacher) likes students.

What is predicate and its types?

What are the different types of predicates? Predicates can be divided into two main categories: action and state of being. Predicates that describe an action can be simple, compound, or complete. A simple predicate is a verb or verb phrase without any modifiers or objects.

What is subject and predicate definition?

Every complete sentence contains two parts: a subject and a predicate. The subject is what (or whom) the sentence is about, while the predicate tells something about the subject.

What is complete predicate?

Complete Predicates. A complete predicate consists of both the verb of a sentence and the words around it; the words that modify the verb and complete its meaning. In this sentence, “he” is the subject.

What are two predicates examples?

Define predicate: The predicate is the part of a sentence or clause containing a verb and stating something about the subject. It includes the verb and anything modifying it. This is also called the complete predicate. Example of a Predicate: We are ready to get food.

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What is the difference between predicate and Predicator?

Predicator means “(In systemic grammar) a verb phrase considered as a constituent of clause structure, along with subject, object, and adjunct.” Predicate means “The part of a sentence or clause containing a verb and stating something about the subject (e.g. went home in John went home).”

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