FAQ

Often asked: Why does your voice sound different in your head?

Why do I think my voice sounds weird?

Most of us have shuddered on hearing the sound of our own voice. This bone conduction of sound delivers rich low frequencies that are not included in air-conducted vocal sound. So when you hear your recorded voice without these frequencies, it sounds higher – and different.

Is it normal to hear your own voice in your head?

It consists of inner speech, where you can “hearyour own voice play out phrases and conversations in your mind. This is a completely natural phenomenon. Some people might experience it more than others. It’s also possible not to experience internal monologue at all.

Do singers like their own voice?

Totally normal — and not just for singers, but most everyone. The first time someone hears her/his own voice on a recording, she/he is almost always shocked. So we become accustomed to our voice sounding like it does in our head.

How does your voice sound in your head?

The first is through vibrating sound waves hitting your ear drum, the way other people hear your voice. The second way is through vibrations inside your skull set off by your vocal chords. Those vibrations travel up through your bony skull and again set the ear drum vibrating.

Is a recording your real voice?

The voice you hear when you speak is the combination of sound carried along both paths. When you listen to a recording of yourself speaking, the bone-conducted pathway that you consider part of yournormalvoice is eliminated, and you hear only the air-conducted component in unfamiliar isolation.

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Do I really sound like my recording?

When you hear your voice on a recording, you’re only hearing sounds transmitted via air conduction. Since you’re missing the part of the sound that comes from bone conduction within the head, your voice sounds different to you on a recording.

Does everybody have a voice in their head?

While the blog sparked debate between the haves and have nots, experts agree that everyone has some sort of internal monologue. “We do all, in fact, have what we colloquially refer to as an inner voice,” Ethan Kross, director of the Self-Control and Emotion Laboratory at the University of Michigan, told TODAY.

Do deaf people have an inner voice?

Primarily though, most completely deaf people think in sign language. Similar to how an “inner voice” of a hearing person is experienced in one’s own voice, a completely deaf person sees or, more aptly, feels themselves signing in their head as they “talk” in their heads.

Why does my voice sound bad to me?

The first is as above, vibrating sound waves hitting your ear drum. The second way is via vibrations inside your skull actually set off by your vocal chords. Those vibrations travel up through your bony skull and again set the ear drum vibrating. This is how literally everyone reacts to their own recorded voice.

Why do I sound horrible when I sing?

The voice that you hear when you are singing isn’t the same that you hear when listening to yourself sing. When you sing, your voice resonates through your sinus cavities. It’s a very common occurrence that singers hate to hear recordings of themselves because they don’t think it sounds like them.

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Why does my voice crack when I sing?

The reason your voice cracks when you’re singing is because of the incapacity of your vocal folds to vibrate at the pitch you desire when trying to sing a sound, no matter how much you force it.

Why do I sound like a kid when I sing?

Watch The Position Of Your Larynx



In layman terms, it’s your Adam’s apple. When the larynx is raised up high as we sing or speak, the tone of our voices naturally become brighter, thinner sounding and somewhat more childlike.

Why does your voice sound different when you wake up?

A deeper voice in the morning is an inevitable result of a good night’s rest. People who breathe through their mouth during sleep quickly dry out their vocal cords. This lack of lubrication hinders our vocal cords from moving together, which creates the normal or higher pitch of our voice.

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