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FAQ: When do you use a or an?

When to use a or an examples?

If the word starts with a vowel sound, you should use “an.” If it starts with a consonant sound, you should use “a.” For example: Buy a house in an hour. (Although “house” and “hour” start with the same three letters (“hou”), one attracts “a” and the other “an.”) An unknown goblin killed a unicorn.

When to use the A and an?

When to Use ‘A,’ ‘An,’ or ‘The’

  1. <trvalign=”top”> General Rules Use “a” or “an” with a singular count noun when you mean “one of many,” “any,” “in general.”
  2. Use “the” with any noun when the meaning is specific; for example, when the noun names the only one (or one) of a kind.

When not to use a or an?

Here’s the secret to making the rule work: The rule applies to the sound of the letter beginning the word, not just the letter itself. The way we say the word will determine whether or not we use a or an. If the word begins with a vowel sound, you must use an. If it begins with a consonant sound, you must use a.

What comes before HOUR A or an?

You use ‘an’ before words that begin with the five vowels – a, e, i, o, u. However, the way you pronounce it and not the spelling, shows you which one you must use. Examples: You should say, ‘an hour‘ (because hour begins with a vowel sound) and ‘a history’ (because history begins with a consonant sound).

Is it an hour or a hour?

For those words that are written with the first letter as a consonant, but which are pronounced with the first letter as a vowel, such as “hour” and “herb,” the correct way to present them in a written document (e.g. your scientific manuscript written in American English) is: “An hour” and “An herb.”

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When should we not use articles?

We do not use articles before the names of countries, people, continents, cities, rivers and lakes.

We do not use articles before uncountable and abstract nouns used in a general sense.

  1. Honey is sweet. (NOT The honey is sweet.)
  2. Sugar is bad for your teeth.
  3. Wisdom is better than riches.
  4. Virtue is its own reward.

Are and is Examples?

If the noun is singular, use is. If it is plural or there is more than one noun, use are. The cat is eating all of his food. The cats are eating all of their food.

What are the article words?

Put simply, an article is a word that combines with a noun. Articles are actually adjectives because they describe the nouns that they precede. In English, there are only three articles: the, a, and an. However, the three are not interchangeable; rather, they are used in specific instances.

Do articles come before adjectives?

You use articles (a/an/the) before adjectives which are followed by the nouns in which they modify. If there is no associated noun, then they can‘t be used. Do not attach articles to adjectives in declarative statements which use adjectives following the noun. So the article is needed.

Do you always use an before a vowel?

The rule is: Use an before a word beginning with a vowel sound (not letter). It doesn’t matter how the word is spelled. Use a before a word with a consonant sound as well as y and w sounds.

Which letters are vowels?

Words are built from vowels (a, e, i, o, u) and consonants (the rest of the alphabet). The letter ‘y’ is a bit different, because sometimes it acts as a consonant and sometimes it acts as a vowel.

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Why is an hour not a hour?

An hour is correct, because “hour” begins with a vowel sound. A vs. an depends on pronunciation, not spelling.

Is an used before hour?

The rule states that “a” should be used before words that begin with consonants (e.g., b, c,d) while “an” should be used before words that begin with vowels (e.g., a,e,i). You should say, therefore, “an hour” (because hour begins with a vowel sound) and “a history” (because history begins with a consonant sound).

Why is an hour called an hour?

They are so named from the false belief of ancient authors that the Babylonians divided the day into 24 parts, beginning at sunrise. In fact, they divided the day into 12 parts (called kaspu or “double hours“) or into 60 equal parts.

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